International

"Nuclear Rules in Japan Relied on Old Science"

"In the country that gave the world the word tsunami, the Japanese nuclear establishment largely disregarded the potentially destructive force of the walls of water. The word did not even appear in government guidelines until 2006, decades after plants — including the Fukushima Daiichi facility that firefighters are still struggling to get under control — began dotting the Japanese coastline."

Source: NY Times, 03/28/2011

"Bees Facing a Poisoned Spring"

"A new generation of pesticides is making honeybees far more susceptible to disease, even at tiny doses, and may be a clue to the mysterious colony collapse disorder that has devastated bees across the world, the US government's leading bee researcher has found. Yet the discovery has remained unpublished for nearly two years since it was made by the US Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory."

Source: UK Independent, 01/20/2011

SEJ's 31st Annual Conference, Houston,TX, March 30-April 3, 2022

Save the dates! SEJ announces our 2022 Annual Conference: Mar 30-Apr 3 in Houston, hosted by Rice University. The #SEJ2022 conference will focus on environmental health and justice, energy and climate change, and oceans and coasts. We'll announce details — including how you can contribute to the agenda — later this spring.

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"Big Banks Make a Dangerous Bet on the World’s Growing Demand for Food"

"As global banking giants and investment firms vow to divest from polluting energy companies, they’re continuing to bankroll another major driver of the climate crisis: food and farming corporations that are responsible, directly or indirectly, for cutting down vast carbon-storing forests and spewing greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere."

Source: Inside Climate News, 03/08/2021

How Fast Are Oceans Rising? Answer May Be In Century-Old Shipping Logs

"Off the coast of England, there's a tiny, wind-swept island with the remains of a lifeboat rescue station from the mid-1800s. The workers who once ran the station on Hilbre Island did something that, unbeknownst to them, has become crucial for understanding the future of a hotter climate: They recorded the tides."

Source: NPR, 03/03/2021

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