Forests

Harnessing the Power of Global Forest Watch for Data-Driven Reporting on Land Cover Change

Whether trees fall to chain saws or go up in smoke, deforestation is a major climate change driver. But on-the-ground reporting on forest loss is often challenging. Global Forest Watch provides worldwide land cover change data and tools that can help journalists contextualize deforestation events. Mongabay editor Morgan Erickson-Davis explains the power of this free online platform and shares her favorite features.

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"The U.S. Just Changed How It Manages A Tenth Of Its Land"

"For decades, the federal government has prioritized oil and gas drilling, hardrock mining and livestock grazing on public lands across the country. That could soon change under a far-reaching Interior Department rule that puts conservation, recreation and renewable energy development on equal footing with resource extraction."

Source: Washington Post, 04/19/2024

Prescribed Burns Prove Their Worth in the Climate-Stressed Texas Panhandle

"In a small Texas city, officials say land previously treated with a prescribed burn stopped the Windy Deuce Fire from entering neighborhoods. But the practice of intentionally burning excess vegetation has faced opposition from some private landowners."

Source: Inside Climate News, 04/16/2024

US Wildfires Get Bigger And More Complex, Changing Firefighting Workforce

"With fires growing in size and duration, federal officials in charge of juggling resources and dispatching crews are pivoting to a new business model they describe as the biggest shift in wildfire management in decades."

Source: AP, 04/10/2024

"Trump’s Second-Term Blueprint Would Take A Wrecking Ball To Public Lands"

"When it was time to outline their vision for managing America’s federal lands under a future Republican presidency, pro-Donald Trump conservatives turned to a man who has spent his career advocating for those very lands to be pawned off to states and private interests."

Source: HuffPost, 04/09/2024

"Mercury Exposure Widespread Among Yanomami Tribe In Amazon, Report Finds"

"Many Yanomami, the Amazon’s largest Indigenous tribe in relative isolation, have been contaminated with mercury coming from widespread illegal gold mining, according to a report released on Thursday by Brazil’s top public health institute."

Source: AP, 04/05/2024

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