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SEJournal is the weekly digital news magazine of the Society of Environmental Journalists. SEJ members are automatically subscribed. Nonmembers may subscribe using the link below. Send questions, comments, story ideas, articles, news briefs and tips to Editor Adam Glenn at sejournaleditor@sej.org. Or contact Glenn if you're interested in joining the SEJournal volunteer editorial staff.

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March 20, 2024

  • Vernal pools — small, ephemeral forest wetlands — may appear humble, but these complex, keystone ecosystems have an outsized ecological role. So when photographer Tristan Spinski set out to deconstruct them by season, species and life-cycle stage, he captured extraordinary moments above and below the water’s surface. Spinski shared his journey with EJ InSight editor Andrew Cullen, along with some nature photography strategies even for those without impressive gear. Plus, view his images.

  • Wildfires in the Texas Panhandle are a good reminder that wildfire season now stretches across much of the year, so environmental journalists would do well to look for ways to localize their reporting on wildfire preparedness. The latest TipSheet offers 10 story ideas and half a dozen reporting resources to tell the story of your community’s wildfire risk.

March 13, 2024

  • Artificial intelligence is at the confluence of forces — concentrated media ownership, the dominance of social media platforms — that are harming press freedoms and the work of journalists. But the WatchDog Opinion column warns AI may quickly further problems of disinformation and censorship. Here’s why, along with some hopeful responses from the journalism profession.

  • Animal agriculture is a massive industry with a vast environmental footprint, so there are plenty of reporting opportunities for journalists on the “eat beat.” In the second of two parts, following last week’s examination of diet-related greenhouse gas emissions, food-and-climate journalist Jenny Splitter serves up a variety of story ideas and information sources, plus some thoughts on solutions journalism.

  • How well are U.S. communities preparing for the threats of climate change? A data-rich climate mapping resource that provides vibrant insight into resilience and adaptation can help reporters better understand the answer, even down to the neighborhood level. The latest Reporter’s Toolbox takes a closer look, including at the many data sets that feed into the resource.

March 6, 2024

  • Many people who want to reduce their carbon footprint consider the climate impacts of diet, but their efforts may be misdirected. When it comes to greenhouse gas emissions, it turns out what we eat is often more important than where it comes from. Sentient Media’s Jenny Splitter unpacks the locavore myth and explains methane burps, carbon opportunity costs and more. First of two parts.

  • What does dragging an old car onto an ice-covered lake have to do with informing your community about the perils of climate heating? Potentially a good deal. The latest TipSheet explains how waning winters and the potential impact on the entertaining tradition of ice fishing can serve as an entry into more serious matters. A dozen story ideas and resources to get you started.

February 28, 2024

  • A new book makes the case that U.S. cities have had their environments, their housing and their businesses warped by parking policies. BookShelf contributor Jennifer Weeks, who shares her own parking-related frustrations, explores the arguments made in “Paved Paradise: How Parking Explains the World,” and also takes a look at what the author sees as “parking-light” solutions.

  • A new Spill Tracker website is a good source of information on chemical spills, albeit one with an agenda. But according to the latest Reporter’s Toolbox, it’s just one among a set of powerful resources for covering dangerous releases, large and small. More on Spill Tracker, plus another half-dozen-plus government and nonprofit data sources on petrochemical incidents.

  • A key U.S. federal agency tasked with investigating the nation’s industrial chemical accidents has been limping along for years. Now, the latest Issue Backgrounder reports that replenished staffing and a funding boost may mean it’s found its footing. But as the pace of chemical accidents accelerates and safety regulations stagnate, will it make a difference?

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